The Fault In Our Stars | John Green
This book takes a real, hard, close look at death, cancer, and life within the most unlikely population: children and teenagers.

Not gonna deny that this book is sad, but it’s weirdly uplifting and witty and energizing. I realized there are so many simple things we take for granted.

They are adapting the book into a movie. I hope they get the tone correct; it will make for a great Garden State-esque film.

Some great nuggets from the book that I plowed through in about three days:



Sometimes you read a book and it fills you with this weird evangelical zeal, and you become convinced that the shattered world will never be put back together unless and until all living humans read the book.
I fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, and then all at once.
The weird thing about houses is that they almost always look like nothing is happening inside of them, even though they contain most of our lives. I wondered if that was sort of the point of architecture.
Some tourists think Amsterdam is a city of sin, but in truth it is a city of freedom. And in freedom, most people find sin.
Funerals, I had decided, are for the living.
Grief does not change you, Hazel. It reveals you.

The Fault In Our Stars | John Green

This book takes a real, hard, close look at death, cancer, and life within the most unlikely population: children and teenagers.
Not gonna deny that this book is sad, but it’s weirdly uplifting and witty and energizing. I realized there are so many simple things we take for granted.
They are adapting the book into a movie. I hope they get the tone correct; it will make for a great Garden State-esque film.
Some great nuggets from the book that I plowed through in about three days:
  • Sometimes you read a book and it fills you with this weird evangelical zeal, and you become convinced that the shattered world will never be put back together unless and until all living humans read the book.
  • I fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, and then all at once.
  • The weird thing about houses is that they almost always look like nothing is happening inside of them, even though they contain most of our lives. I wondered if that was sort of the point of architecture.
  • Some tourists think Amsterdam is a city of sin, but in truth it is a city of freedom. And in freedom, most people find sin.
  • Funerals, I had decided, are for the living.
  • Grief does not change you, Hazel. It reveals you.
Fresh Off the Boat | All you need to know about Eddie Huang is that he’s effing hilarious and crazy smart. He’ll school you on Asian stereotypes, food, basketball, street wear, and sneakers. 
Some favorite parts of his memoir about growing up Taiwanese-American in Florida and later in high school, college, law school and eventually opening his NYC restaurant Baohaus:

I think my mom is manic, but Chinese people don’t believe in psychologists. We just drink more tea when things go bad. 
The easiest way for Americans to make sense of Chinese history is to compare everything to Jewish history.
I remember thinking to myself that if I died, I wanted to come back a white man. These fuckers had EVERYTHING.
Obama was, is, and will forever be my homeboy.
I tell people all the time. Whether it’s a girl, a skirt steak, or a record, you know in the first five seconds if it’s a hit.
I did what every culture does when Americans can’t understand something: I put it on bread. From banh-mi to baos to arepas to Jamaican beef patties, it takes a little coco bread to make the medicine go down. Barack, I told you to put the health-care bill on some Red Lobster cheddar biscuits, dun!
We don’t wear chef coats, we wear Nikes, and Dipset is the anthem.

Everyone should hear Eddie talk, cuz he knows how to break it down and he sincerely enjoys food and recognizes quality. Check out his blog or watch his online series about eating food around the world:
http://thepopchef.blogspot.com/ 
http://www.vice.com/fresh-off-the-boat

Fresh Off the Boat | All you need to know about Eddie Huang is that he’s effing hilarious and crazy smart. He’ll school you on Asian stereotypes, food, basketball, street wear, and sneakers.


Some favorite parts of his memoir about growing up Taiwanese-American in Florida and later in high school, college, law school and eventually opening his NYC restaurant Baohaus:

I think my mom is manic, but Chinese people don’t believe in psychologists. We just drink more tea when things go bad.

The easiest way for Americans to make sense of Chinese history is to compare everything to Jewish history.

I remember thinking to myself that if I died, I wanted to come back a white man. These fuckers had EVERYTHING.

Obama was, is, and will forever be my homeboy.

I tell people all the time. Whether it’s a girl, a skirt steak, or a record, you know in the first five seconds if it’s a hit.

I did what every culture does when Americans can’t understand something: I put it on bread. From banh-mi to baos to arepas to Jamaican beef patties, it takes a little coco bread to make the medicine go down. Barack, I told you to put the health-care bill on some Red Lobster cheddar biscuits, dun!

We don’t wear chef coats, we wear Nikes, and Dipset is the anthem.

Everyone should hear Eddie talk, cuz he knows how to break it down and he sincerely enjoys food and recognizes quality. Check out his blog or watch his online series about eating food around the world:

http://thepopchef.blogspot.com/

http://www.vice.com/fresh-off-the-boat

Where’d You Go Bernadette | A funny epistolary satirical novel, and a must-read if you are from or have ever visisted Seattle, the Pacific-Northwest, or in general want to make fun of the tech world and the culture that comes with it.
Some funny tidbits from Maria Semple’s novel:

It was hilarious to see these macho guys from Mexico sitting in chairs and knitting out in the sun. They loved it, though. They’d play their ranchera music on the radio and gossip like a bunch of ladies. When your eyes are softly focused on the horizon for sustained periods, your brain releases endorphins. It’s the same as a runners high. These days, we all spend our lives staring at screens twelve inches in front of us. It’s a nice change. The way you might fear a cow sitting down in the middle of the street during rush hour, that’s how I fear Canadians. To Canadians, everyone is equal.

Where’d You Go Bernadette | A funny epistolary satirical novel, and a must-read if you are from or have ever visisted Seattle, the Pacific-Northwest, or in general want to make fun of the tech world and the culture that comes with it.

Some funny tidbits from Maria Semple’s novel:

It was hilarious to see these macho guys from Mexico sitting in chairs and knitting out in the sun. They loved it, though. They’d play their ranchera music on the radio and gossip like a bunch of ladies.

When your eyes are softly focused on the horizon for sustained periods, your brain releases endorphins. It’s the same as a runners high. These days, we all spend our lives staring at screens twelve inches in front of us. It’s a nice change.

The way you might fear a cow sitting down in the middle of the street during rush hour, that’s how I fear Canadians. To Canadians, everyone is equal.

The Sisters Brothers

Join the murderous brothers Eli and (his more fearsome brother) Charlie Sisters as they head from Oregon City to San Francisco to kill a man for his secret gold-finding potion in the height of the Gold Rush in 1851.
It’s one hell of an adventure, written by Patrick deWitt. And the best part was hearing about SF and how not much has changed in 260-plus years.
Some bits of the book that stood out:
The creak of bed springs suffering under the weight of a restless man is asĀ  lonely a sound as I know.

This perhaps was what lay at the very root of the hysteria surrounding what came to be known as the Gold Rush: Men desiring a feeling of fortune; the unlucky masses hoping to skin or borrow the luck of others, or the luck of a destination.
Luck was something you either earned or invented through strength of character. You had to come by it honestly; you could not trick or bluff your way into it.

Every man that has ever held a position has thought about quitting.

On San Francisco:
‘My feelings about San Francisco rise and fall with my moods. Or is it that the town alters my moods, thus informing my opinions? Either way, one day it is my true friend, a few days after, my bitterest enemy.’

Gone Girl

The only thing to say after reading “Gone Girl” by Gillian Flynn is that I — and likely anyone else who’s read this — does not want to get married anytime soon.

Here was a cool quote from this creepy (but such a page-turner!) book:

Sleep is like a cat: it only comes to you if you ignore it

Norwegian Wood

"Everything was too sharp and clear, so that I could never tell where to start — the way a map that shows too much can sometimes be useless."

—Haruki Murakami, Norwegian Wood, which I highly recommend.

This book, which almost reads almost like a diary, was translated from the Japanese and still timely and relevant and makes you think about your relationships and purpose even though written in the 1980s.