The number of books by the side of my bed is growing out of control

The number of books by the side of my bed is growing out of control

This book chain is off the chain. But seriously, impressive feat, Seattle Public Library!

This is where I leave you


This is where I leave you | Jonathan Tropper

This book is going to be out as a movie this November with Jason Bateman playing the down-on-his-luck main character, Judd Foxman. Also Adam Driver of “Girls” fame will be in it. It’s directed by the same guy who did “The Internship,” so I’m a bit dubious…

Here are some parts of the book I enjoyed while reading the antics of a Jew-ish family sitting shiva for their father:

The thing about people who work in finance is that they consider their job infinitely more important than anything or anyone….

You could fill an airlift to Africa with all the food generated by one dead Jew.

Never marry a beautiful woman. Worship them if you must, go to bed with them if you can — by all means, everyone should have carnal knowledge of physical perfection at least once in their life — but when it comes to marriage, it’s a losing proposition. You will never stop feeling like a gatecrasher at your own party. Instead of feeling lucky, you will spend your life on edge, waiting for the other stiletto to fall and puncture your heart like a bullet.

…it’s impossible to know the people your parents were before they were your parents.

Happy birthday to my tumblr. Check it out! sashajol

Happy birthday to my tumblr. Check it out! sashajol

The Fault In Our Stars | John Green
This book takes a real, hard, close look at death, cancer, and life within the most unlikely population: children and teenagers.

Not gonna deny that this book is sad, but it’s weirdly uplifting and witty and energizing. I realized there are so many simple things we take for granted.

They are adapting the book into a movie. I hope they get the tone correct; it will make for a great Garden State-esque film.

Some great nuggets from the book that I plowed through in about three days:



Sometimes you read a book and it fills you with this weird evangelical zeal, and you become convinced that the shattered world will never be put back together unless and until all living humans read the book.
I fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, and then all at once.
The weird thing about houses is that they almost always look like nothing is happening inside of them, even though they contain most of our lives. I wondered if that was sort of the point of architecture.
Some tourists think Amsterdam is a city of sin, but in truth it is a city of freedom. And in freedom, most people find sin.
Funerals, I had decided, are for the living.
Grief does not change you, Hazel. It reveals you.

The Fault In Our Stars | John Green

This book takes a real, hard, close look at death, cancer, and life within the most unlikely population: children and teenagers.
Not gonna deny that this book is sad, but it’s weirdly uplifting and witty and energizing. I realized there are so many simple things we take for granted.
They are adapting the book into a movie. I hope they get the tone correct; it will make for a great Garden State-esque film.
Some great nuggets from the book that I plowed through in about three days:
  • Sometimes you read a book and it fills you with this weird evangelical zeal, and you become convinced that the shattered world will never be put back together unless and until all living humans read the book.
  • I fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, and then all at once.
  • The weird thing about houses is that they almost always look like nothing is happening inside of them, even though they contain most of our lives. I wondered if that was sort of the point of architecture.
  • Some tourists think Amsterdam is a city of sin, but in truth it is a city of freedom. And in freedom, most people find sin.
  • Funerals, I had decided, are for the living.
  • Grief does not change you, Hazel. It reveals you.

Slammed | Colleen Hoover

i’m gonna slam this book for being so sappy and pretty unbelievable. It was written like Twilight and 50 Shades of Grey. But it did suck you in, even if you had to read random spoken word poetry that wasn’t particularly brilliant. And why is a 21-year-old hottie teaching high school English? And is the Layken main character really that amazing? I just couldn’t accept a lot of the connections these people had with each other.

Should I read the sequel and third part of the series? Watch me do that just because I’ll want to know what happens…

Looking back at 2013 through all the books I read (all 40 of them)

Looking back at 2013 through all the books I read (all 40 of them)

You write because you have an idea in your mind that feels so genuine, so important, so true. And yet, by the time this idea passes through the different filters of your mind, and into your hand, and onto the page or computer screen—it becomes distorted, and it’s been diminished. The writing you end up with is an approximation, if you’re lucky, of whatever it was you really wanted to say.

When this happens, it’s quite a sobering reminder of your limitations as a writer.

[…]

But that’s what art is for—for both reader and writer to overcome their respective limitations and encounter something true. It seems miraculous, doesn’t it? That somebody can articulate something clearly and beautifully that exists inside you, something shrouded in impenetrable fog. Great art reaches through the fog, towards this secret heart—and it shows it to you, holds it before you. It’s a revelatory, incredibly moving experience when this happens. You feel understood. You feel heard. That’s why we come to art—we feel less alone. We are less alone. You see, through art, that others have felt the way you have—and you feel better.

Khaled Hosseini always knows what to say, even about writing

(via explore-blog)

Reblogged from Explore